nature-images

nature-images

nature-images (39)nature-images (38) nature-images (37) nature-images (36) nature-images (35) nature-images (34) nature-images (33) nature-images (32) nature-images (31) nature-images (30) nature-images (29) nature-images (28) nature-images (27) nature-images (26) nature-images (25) nature-images (24) nature-images (23) nature-images (22) nature-images (21) nature-images (20) nature-images (19) nature-images (18) nature-images (17) nature-images (16) nature-images (15) nature-images (14) nature-images (13) nature-images (12) nature-images (11) nature-images (10) nature-images (9) nature-images (8) nature-images (6) nature-images (5) nature-images (4) nature-images (3) nature-images (2) nature-images (1) nature-images

Art MovementsAbstract ExpressionismMovement in painting, originating in New York City in the 1940s. It emphasized spontaneous personal expression, freedom from accepted artistic values, surface qualities of paint, and the act of painting itself. Pollock, de Kooning, Motherwell, and Kline, are important abstract expressionists.AbstractA 20th century style of painting in which nonrepresentational lines, colors, shapes, and forms replace accurate visual depiction of objects, landscape, and figures. The subjects often stylized, blurred, repeated or broken down into basic forms so that it becomes unrecognizable. Intangible subjects such as thoughts, emotions, and time are often expressed in abstract art form.AntiqueAnything that is pre-1900.BaroqueA movement in European painting in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, characterized by violent movement, strong emotion, and dramatic lighting and coloring. Bernini, Caravaggio and Rubens were among important baroque artists.ClassicismReferring to the principles of Greek and Roman art of antiquity with the emphasis on harmony, proportion, balance, and simplicity. In a general sense, it refers to art based on accepted standards of beauty.ContemporaryAnything made within the last 30 years approximately.CubismAn art style developed in 1908 by Picasso and Braque whereby the artist breaks down the natural forms of the subjects into geometric shapes and creates a new kind of pictorial space. In contrast to traditional painting styles where the perspective of subjects is fixed and complete, cubist work can portray the subject from multiple perspectives.DadaismAn art style founded by Hans Arp in Zurich after WW1 which challenged the established canons of art, thoughts and morality etc. Disgusted with the war and society in general, Dadaist expressed their feelings by creating “non-art.” The term Dada, nonsense or baby-talk term, symbolizes the loss of meaning in the European culture. Dada art is difficult to interpret since there is no common foundation.DecoDesign style prevalent during the 1920s and 1930s, characterized by a sleek use of straight lines and slender form.ExpressionismAn art movement of the early 20th century in which traditional adherence to realism and proportion was replaced by the artist’s emotional connection to the subject. These paintings are often abstract, the subject matter distorted in color and form to emphasize and express the intense emotion of the artist.FauvismFrom the French word fauve , meaning “wild beast .” A style adopted by artists associated with Matisse, c. 1905-08. They painted in a spontaneous manner, using bold colors.Figurative ArtArt in which recognizable figures or objects are portrayed.Folk ArtTraditional representations, usually bound by conventions in both form and content, of a folkloric character and usually made by persons without institutionalized training.GothicA European movement beginning in France. Gothic sculpture emerged c. 1200, Gothic painting later in the thirteenth century. The artwork are characterized by a linear, graceful, elegant style more naturalistic than that which had existed previously in Europe.ImpressionismAn art movement founded in France in the last third of the 19th century. Impressionist artists sought to break up light into its component colors and render its ephemeral play on various objects. The artist’s vision was intensely centered on light and the ways it transforms the visible world. This style of painting is characterized by short brush strokes of bright colors used to recreate visual impressions of the subject and to capture the light, climate and atmosphere of the subject at a specific moment in time. The chosen colors represent light which is broken down into its spectrum components and recombined by the eyes into another color when viewed at a distance (an optical mixture). The term was first used in 1874 by a journalist ridiculing a landscape by Monet called Impression – Sunrise.ModernAnything that is from the period between 1900 to 1949. Examples: Picasso, Salvador Dali.Naïve ArtArtwork, usually paintings, characterized by a simplified style, nonscientific perspective, and bold colors. The artists are generally not professionally trained. Henri Rousseau and Grandma Moses worked in this style. Also called Outsider Art. Naïve artwork are characteristically bright, colorful, with abundant space and generally depict a non-naturalistic vision of the artist’s imagination. Important artists include: Rousseau, Hirschfield, and Cook.NeoclassicismA European style of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Its elegant, balanced works revived the order and harmony of ancient Greek and Roman art. David and Canova are examples of neoclassicists.NouveauA decorative art movement that emerged in the late nineteenth century. Characterized by dense asymmetrical ornamentation in sinuous forms, it is often symbolic and of an erotic nature. Gustav Klimt worked in an art nouveau/symbolist style.PhotorealismA figurative movement that emerged in the United States and Britain in the late 1960s and 1970s. The subject matter, usually everyday scenes, is portrayed in an extremely detailed, exacting style. It is also called superrealism, especially when referring to sculpture.Pop ArtA style of art which seeks its inspiration from commercial art and items of mass culture (such as comic strips, popular foods and brand name packaging). Pop art was first developed in New York City in the 1950’s and soon became the dominant avant-garde art form in the United States.RealismA style of painting which depicts subject matter (form, color, space) as it appears in actuality or ordinary visual experience without distortion or stylization. In a general sense, refers to objective representation. More specifically, a nineteenth century movement, especially in France, that rejected idealized academic styles in favor of everyday subjects. Daumier, Millet, and Courbet were realists.RenaissanceMeaning “rebirth” in French. Refers to Europe c. 1400-1600. Renaissance art which began in Italy, stressed the forms of classical antiquity, a realistic representation of space based on scientific perspective, and secular subjects. The works of Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael exemplify the balance and harmony of the High Renaissance (c. 1495-1520).RepresentationalArtwork that purports to represent what is seen; also called objective art.RococoAn eighteenth-century European style, originating in France. In reaction to the grandeur and massiveness of the baroque, rococo employed refined, elegant, highly decorative forms. Fragonard worked in this style.RomanticismAn art style which emphasizes the personal, emotional and dramatic through the use of exotic, literary or historical subject matter. A European movement of the late eighteenth to mid nineteenth century. In reaction to neoclassicism, it focused on emotion over reason, and on spontaneous expression. The subject matter was invested with drama and usually painted energetically in brilliant colors. Delacroix, Gericault, Turner, and Blake were Romantic artists.SurrealismAn art style developed in Europe in the 1920’s, characterized by using the subconscious as a source of creativity to liberate pictorial subjects and ideas. Surrealist paintings often depict unexpected or irrational objects in an atmosphere of fantasy, creating a dreamlike scenario.SymbolismAn art style developed in the late 19th century characterized by the incorporation of symbols and ideas, usually spiritual or mystical in nature, which represent the inner life of people. Traditional modeled, pictorial depictions are replaced or contrasted by flat mosiac-like surfaces decoratively embellished with figures and design elements. Gustav Klimt worked in an art nouveau/symbolist style.Art MediumsAcrylicAcrylic is a popular and versatile painting medium, using pigments dispersed in a polymethyl methacrylate vehicle. Acrylic paintings are generally less translucent than oil paintings.CharcoalCompressed burned wood used for drawing.Dry brushA painting technique in which a little bit of paint is put on a dry brush. When applied, it produces a broken, scratchy effect.GouacheGouache paintings use an opaque watercolor paint that creates a light reflection due to its slight chalky finish.OilConsidered as the standard medium for paintings, since the sixteenth century, Oil Paintings are the most popular and luminous of all paintings.PastelPigments mixed with gum and water, and pressed into a dried stick form for use as crayons. Works of art done with such pigments are also called pastels.PencilAn implement for drawing, consisting of a thin rod of graphite, colored wax, chalk, charcoal, or another such substance which can be sharpened to a fine point, either encased in wood or held in a mechanical holder.WatercolorsWatercolour paintings are generally characterized by luminous transparency. These artwork are created by a paint medium that consists of pigment dispersed in gum arabic Academic, c. 16th century–20th centuryAesthetic MovementAmerican Barbizon schoolAmerican ImpressionismAmsterdam ImpressionismArt Nouveau, c. 1890–1910Arts and Crafts Movement, founded 1860sBarbizon school, c. 1830s–1870sBiedermeier, c. 1815–1848Cloisonnism, c. 1888–1900s (decade)Danish Golden AgeDecadent movementDivisionism, c. 1880s–1910sDüsseldorf SchoolEtching revivalExpressionism, c. 1890s–1930sGerman Romanticism, c. 1790s–1850sGründerzeitHague School, c. 1860s–1890sHeidelberg School, c. 1880s–1900s (decade)History painting, c. 15th century–20th centuryHoosier GroupHudson River School, c. 1820s–1900s (decade)Impressionism, c. 1860s–1920sIncoherents, c. 1882-1890sJugendstilLes Nabis, c. 1890s–1900s (decade)Les VingtLuminismLyon SchoolMacchiaioli c. 1850s–1900s (decade)Mir iskusstva, founded 1898Modernism, c. 1860s-ongoingNaturalismNazarene, c. 1810s–1830Neo-Classicism, c. 1780s–1900s (decade)Neo-impressionism, c. 1880s–1910sNorwegian romantic nationalism, c. 1840–1867Norwich School, founded 1803OrientalismPeredvizhnikiPointillism, c. 1880s–1910sPont-Aven School, c. 1850s–1890sPost-Impressionism, c. 1880s–1900s (decade)Pre-Raphaelite BrotherhoodRealism, c. 1850s–1900s (decade)Realism, c. 1850s–1900s (decade)Romanticism, c. 1750s–1890sSecession Groups, c. 1890s–1910sSociety of American Artists, c. 1877–1906Spanish Eclecticism, c. 1845-1890sSymbolismSynthetism, c. 1877–1900s (decade)Tonalism, c. 1880–1915Vienna Secession, founded 1897White Mountain art, c. 1820s–1870s20th century1900–1918Wassily Kandinsky, 1903, Der Blaue Reiter 21.1 cm × 54.6 cm (8.3 in × 21.5 in)Pablo Picasso, Family of Saltimbanques, 1905, Picasso’s Rose PeriodHenri Matisse 1905, FauvismPablo Picasso 1907, Proto-CubismGeorges Braque 1910, Analytic CubismPiet Mondrian, 1912, early De StijlKazimir Malevich, (Supremus No. 58), Museum of Art, 1916, SuprematismMarcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917, photograph by Alfred Stieglitz, DadaAcademic, c. 1900s (decade)-ongoingAmerican realism, c. 1890s–1920sAnalytic Cubism, c. 1909–1912Art Deco, c. 1920s–1940sAshcan School, c. 1890s–1920sBerliner Sezession, founded 1898Bloomsbury Group, c. 1900s (decade)–1960sCamden Town Group, c. 1911–1913Constructivism, c. 1920–1922, 1920s–1940sCubism, c. 1906–1919Cubo-Futurism, c. 1912–1918Czech Cubism, c. 1910–1914Dada, c. 1916–1922Der Blaue Reiter, c. 1911–1914De Stijl, c. 1917–1931Deutscher Werkbund, founded 1907Die Brücke, founded 1905Expressionism c. 1890s–1930sFauvism, c. 1900–1910Futurism, c. 1909–1916German Expressionism, c. 1913–1930Group of Seven (Canada), c. 1913–1930sJack of Diamonds, founded 1909Luminism (Impressionism), c. 1900s (decade)–1930sModernism, c. 1860s–ongoingNeo-Classicism, c. 1900s (decade)–ongoingNeo-primitivism, from 1913Neue Künstlervereinigung MünchenNovembergruppe, founded 1918Objective Abstraction, c. 1933–1936Orphism, c. 1910–1913Photo-Secession, founded c. 1902Picasso’s Blue Period, c. 1901–1904Picasso’s Rose Period, c. 1904–1906Picasso’s African Period, 1906–1909Pittura Metafisica, c. 1911–1920Proto-Cubism, c. 1906–1908Purism, c. 1917–1930sRayonismSection d’Or, c. 1912–1914Suprematism, formed c. 1915–1916Synchromism, founded 1912Synthetic Cubism, c. 1912–1919The Eight, c. 1909–1918The Ten, c. 1897–1920Vorticism, founded 19141918–1945Theo van Doesburg, Composition XX, 1920, De StijlMax Ernst, The Elephant Celebes (1921), Tate, SurrealismCharles Demuth, I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold, 1928, Metropolitan Museum of Art, PrecisionismGrant Wood, American Gothic, 1930, Social RealismAmerican Scene painting, c. 1920s–1950sArbeitsrat für KunstArt DecoBauhaus, c. 1919–1933Concrete artDer RingDe Stijl, c. 1917–1931Ecole de ParisGeometric abstractionGruppo 7International Style, c. 1920s–1970sKapists, c. 1930sMagic RealismNeo-RomanticismNeue SachlichkeitNovecento ItalianoNovembergruppe, founded 1918Precisionism, c. 1918–1940sRegionalism (art), c. 1930s–1940sReturn to order, 1918–1922Scuola Romana, c. 1928–1945Social Realism, c. 1920s–1960sSocialist RealismSurrealism, c. 1920s–1960s1940–1965Arshile Gorky, The Liver is the Cock’s Comb (1944), oil on canvas, 731/4 × 98″ (186 × 249 cm) Albright–Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York. Gorky was an Armenian-born American painter who had a seminal influence on Abstract Expressionism. De Kooning said: “I met a lot of artists — but then I met Gorky… He had an extraordinary gift for hitting the nail on the head; remarkable. So I immediately attached myself to him and we became very good friends.”[14]Abstract expressionismAction paintingArte PoveraArt InformelAssemblageBeatnik artChicago ImagistsCoBrA, c. 1948–1951Color Field paintingCombine paintingDe-collageFluxusHappeningHard-Edge PaintingKinetic ArtKitchen Sink SchoolLettrismLyrical abstractionNeo-DadaNew BrutalismNorthwest SchoolNouveau RéalismeOp ArtOrganic abstractionOutsider ArtPanic MovementPop ArtPost-painterly abstractionPublic artRetro artSerial artShaped canvasSituationist InternationalTachismVideo art1965–2000Abstract IllusionismAppropriationArte PoveraArt PhotographyBody ArtClassical RealismConceptual ArtDogme 95Earth ArtFiguration LibreFunk artGraffiti artHyperrealismInstallation artInternet ArtLand artLate modernismLight and SpaceLowbrowLyrical AbstractionMassurrealismMinimalismNeo-ExpressionismNeo-figurativeNeo-popPerformance ArtPostminimalismPostmodernismPhotorealismPsychedelic artRelational artSite-specific artSound ArtSteampunkTransavanguardiaYoung British Artists21st centuryAlgorithmic artAltermodernismComputer artComputer graphicsDigital artElectronic ArtEnvironmental artExcessivismIntentismInternet artIntervention artMaximalismMetamodernismNeo-minimalism New Media Art Post-postmodernism Relational art Remodernism SoFlo Superflat Stuckism InternationalSuperflatSuperstrokeTransgressive artVirtual art Malerei ungegenständlich -Abstrakt – allgemein – 1018Abstrakter Expressionismus – 421Geometrische Abstraktion – 43Informel – 52KinderKunst abstrakt – 3Konkrete Kunst – 87Konstruktivismus – 8Kubismus – 82Minimalismus – 13Naive Malerei – 90Suprematismus – 2Tachismus – 1Malerei gegenständlich -Expressionismus – 487Figuration – 356Fotorealismus – 103Futurismus – 23Historismus – 17Illustration – 51Impressionismus – 351KinderKunst – 4Naturalismus – 442Phantast. Realismus »Alle Werke des Stils (389)Auktion (17)Verhandlung (93)Festpreis (137)Verkauft (12)Präsentation (46)auf Anfrage (84)Künstler des Stils ein | ausPop Art – 122Realismus – 560Romantik – 127Sakrale Kunst – 33Surrealismus – 297Symbolismus – 100Anderes als Malerei -Digitale Kunst – 1030Fotokunst – 299Objektkunst – 156Weder Noch – 166Zeichnung – 1376086 Exponate daraus beinhalten:122 – abstraction605 – Abstraktion231 – Aktmalerei256 – Architektur125 – Bizarre Bilder232 – Blumenbilder60 – Dreamscapes145 – Experimentelles236 – Gegenständliches1121 – Landschaften1071 – Menschen61 – Menschen/611 – Motivationsbilder52 – Musik19 – Neurotisches27 – phantastics334 – Phantastisches47 – Religiöse Kunst» Spirituelle-Kunst …».. alle Werke (204)».. Auktion (3)».. Verhandlung (61)».. Festpreis (66)».. Verkauft (5)».. Präsentation (34)».. auf Anfrage (35)16 – Sportbilder113 – Stilleben268 – Tierbilder7 – TOP Angebot37 – Verrücktes86 – WeltallKunstauktionenart new yorkart new york cityart new york timesart new york pier 94art new york internship fairart new york march 2016art new york galaart new york south oxford spaceart new york contextart new yorkerart new york art fairart new york april 2016art new york alliance of resident theatersart pepper new york albumart deco new york architectureart fair new york armoryart show new york armoryart institute new york addressnew york art academynew york affordable art fairart new york by art miamiart new york bootsart new york blogart new york brooklynstreet art new york banksyart deco new york buildingsstreet art new york bookart deco new york bookstreet art new york brooklynart gallery new york brooklynart new york city museumsart new york chelseaart new york collegeart galleries new york cityart supplies new york citystreet art new york cityart school new york cityart 21 new york close upart exhibitions new york december 2013art institute new york dormsart collectors new york documentaryart exhibitions new york december 2014art fair new york decemberart shows new york december 2013flash art new york deskart institute of new york deadline applicationart institute of new york degreesart institute of new york deadlineart new york exhibitionsart miami new york exhibitorsart miami new york edie sedgwickart institute of new york essay questionart institute of new york essaymetropolitan museum art new york exhibitsmuseum modern art new york exhibitsart institute of new york eventsart institute of new york employmentart institute of new york enrollmentart new york fairart new york fair may 2016gallery art new york facebookart institute new york fashion weekart school new york free tuitionnail art new york fashion weekart college new york free tuitionart institute new york fashion showart miami new york fairart new york galleryart museum new york guggenheimpop art new york gallerystreet art new york gallerycontemporary art new york gallerymodern art new york galleryabstract art new york galleriespop art new york gelatoart forum new york galleriesart deco new york hotelart institute new york housingstreet art new york historymetropolitan art new york hoursmuseum modern art new york hoursart students league new york historyart institute of new york hoursart institute of new york housing costmuseum of art new york hoursmetropolitan museum art new york hoursart institute new yorkart in new yorknew york invisible artnew york art in 6 minutesart in new york citynew york art in 6 minnew york art internshipsnew york institute art and designart institute new york cityart new york jobsart new york juneart farmer new york jazz sextetart farmer new york jazz sessionsart exhibitions new york january 2014art director new york jobart exhibitions new york january 2015art exhibitions new york june 2014art exhibitions new york june 2015art galleries new york jobsart karat new yorkks art new yorkkinetic art new yorknew york art kingskorean art new yorkmuseum of modern art new york klimtart kibbutz new yorknew york knicks artmuseum of modern art new york kandinskyklimt art new yorkbanksy art new york locationsart garfunkel new york lyricsart museum new york listart garfunkel new york liveart gallery new york liststreet art new york locationsart smith new york lifeart gallery new york lower east sideart tangen new york lifeprop art new york llcart new york may 2016art new york museumart new york magazineart galleries new york manhattanart fair new york march 2015art fair new york may 2014art fair new york marchart exhibitions new york may 2015contemporary art new york museumart new york newsart new york nowart bar new york nyscholten japanese art new york nyart raw gallery new york nysoho contemporary art new york nyart museum nyc new york nyart students league new york nyrubin museum of art new york nynail art new yorkart exhibitions new york october 2014art exhibitions new york october 2013art gallery new york onlineart fair new york october 2014art newspaper new york officeart institute new york open houseart new york time outart institute of new york online coursesart in america new york officeart new york paul tschinkelart new york paintingart deco new york posterart expo new york pier 94art gallery new york photographyart school new york photographyart miami new york pier 94art expo new york poster challengeart institute new york photographyart new york quotesnew york art quartetnew york art quartet mohawknew york art quartet old stuffnew york art quartet box setnew york art quartet discogsnew york art quartet boxquadriga art new yorknew york art quartet 35th reunionnew york art quartet blogspotart new york rehearsal spaceart new york rochesterart expo new york reviewart institute new york reviewart deco new york restaurantart miami new york reviewsart smith new york restaurantart studio new york rentart institute of new york requirementsvip jewelry art new york reviewsart new york schoolart new york spacesart new york skylineart new york subwayart new york shoesart new york showart new york storeart gallery new york street manchesterwall art new york skylineart new york times magazineart new york tumblrart new york todaystreet art new york tourart reviews new york timesart director new york timesart in new york this weekart institute new york tuitionart new york universityart new york university of rochesterart history new york universityart therapy new york universityfine art new york universityart galleries new york upper east sideart 21 new york up closeart supplies new york upper east sidevisual art new york universityart cafe new york upper west sidebanksy art new york videostreet art new york videomuseum modern art new york van goghmuseum modern art new york virtual tourart students league new york vytlacil campusart institute of new york video game designmetropolitan museum art new york virtual tourart institute of new york video productionart institute of new york varick streetvisual art new yorkart in new york wikipediaart in new york wikiart.com new york windowart gallery new york wildensteinart school new york wikiart 1939 new york world’s fairart students league new york workshopsart institute of new york wikiart institute of new york websitemuseum of art new york wikinew york yankees clipart logonew york yankees clipartnew york yankees artnew york yankees wall artnew york yankees nail artnew york yankees canvas artart makes you smart new york timesyoutube spray paint art new yorknew york yankees symbol clip artart galleries new york new yorkart institute of new york zip codezero art new yorkart zuckerman new yorkart zulu new yorkjay z art new yorkart to zen rochester new yorkzelda’s art world new yorkzucker art books new yorkmuseum 0f modern art new yorkstreet art new york 1980art scene new york 1970sstreet art new york 1970art deco new york 1930new york art 1980snew york art 1970smuseum of modern art new york 1929new york art 1920snew york art 1950snew york art 1960sart new york 2016art new york 2014art new york 2015art new york 2013art expo new york 2014art expo new york 2015art fair new york 2014art fair new york 2015art miami new york 2015art expo new york 2013pop art new york 3d3d art new york3d art new york city3d street art new yorknew york 3d sidewalk artart 3 gallery new york3d chalk art new york3d nail art new york3d street art new york citystreet art new york for saleart of new york for saleart new york 520 spacesart new york 520 8th aveart supply new york 57thart institute of new york 57th streetart 5 new york convention5 points art new yorknew york art school 57th streetnew york art in 5 minutesart 57th street new york5 pointz art new yorkbanksy art new york $60spray paint art new york 6 minutesnew york art 6 minutesflemish art company new york 682new york art 6 minnew york street art 6 minutesnew york art scene 60snew york central art supply 62 third avenuenew york city art in 6 minutes7th art new yorknew york art 70snew york art scene 70’sart 7.1 convention de new yorkart 7 convention de new yorkart 7 convenzione di new yorkart garfunkel new york 7?24?art new york 890 shoesart new york 898art new york 891new york 80s art scenenew york 80s artnew york art school 8th streetart new york 884art. 8 convenzione di new yorkbottes art new york 88499 cents fine art new yorkart 9 convenzione di new york